The Cure

Head On The Door

I’m pretty sure that The Cure Saved my life.  Not in a “jump in the river and pull me out” type of way but more because they offered me an alternative mind set to the crushingly conservative and predictable 1980’s teenage life I found myself living in West Sussex.

Courtesy of the local charity shops, The Cure changed my image but they also changed my outlook.  Suddenly it was more than OK to be slightly ridiculous and not in-step with other people.  Being yourself was the most important thing and if society didn’t like this then that was just fine with me.  I finally found a voice, and a wardrobe which included a pair of Converse sneakers and a second hand black suit that was at least three sizes too big for me, and don’t forget the fluorescent socks!

Very important were those garish socks because they were a feature of The Cure’s 1985 “Head On The Door” album.  A definitive Cure classic, and their first true “pop” album, although the band’s version of pop was devised of skewed and jumbled styles, no two songs sounded the same and yet it was all undeniably the work of one fiercely individual group who just happened to come from Crawley, not that far from my own home town of Chichester.

If it’s in print, Vinyl Revolution will always stock “The Head On The Door” because it meant (and still means) so much to me.  Without this LP (named after a recurring dream of singer Robert Smith) I would never have found the courage to set off on my own musical adventure.  And I guess that means there would be no Vinyl Revolution.

For those thinking of exploring The Cure’s extensive back catalogue (do it!), may I humbly recommend you begin with “Disintegration”, “Seventeen Seconds”, “Bloodflowers” and the “Standing On A Beach” singles compilation.

And of course “The Head On The Door”.  Who knows? Maybe it will save your life too.

cure-pic1

Dusty Music Vaults…are go!

So, I have been collecting records since I was about twelve years old. OK, so I also bought a few records in the mid 1970’s but 1979 was my real awakening to singles and albums. The hallowed 7″  was my favourite format as I couldn’t afford albums at the time. Anyone with a good memory will recall that 1979 was an exceptionally good time to start collecting singles as new wave and pop reigned supreme. And this meant lots of coloured vinyl to seek out.

‘Dusty Music Vaults’ hopes to introduce you to songs you may have long since forgotten or never heard of. Whether its on vinyl or CD (a tune is a tune in any language, right?) I aim to include tracks from all walks of pop culture, but most likely the 80’s and 90’s will be the best represented as these were my former musical stomping grounds.

Ready for the off? Let’s begin with three stonewall classics…

SQUEEZE – PULLING MUSSELS (FROM A SHELL) (1980).

Unbelievably this breezy little tune stalled at number 44 on the UK singles chart back in 1980. High on melodic charm and welded to a soaring Difford and Tilbrook chorus, ‘Mussels’ should have been a huge hit but somehow ended up getting a bit lost. I suspect this might have had something to do with the fact that the title came complete with it’s own set of (song title in brackets). Generally, brackets are too confusing in pop. It’s much better to have a snappy one word tagline for DJ’s to get their vocal chords around, isn’t it?

But I was always good with brackets and very happy to procure a limited edition red vinyl 7″. Heaven.

*Fast forward to about 1:05mins for the bands performance on the TOTP clip below. Unfortunately the video begins with Radio One’s Dave Lee Travis in a pair of shorts. Sorry about that.

Squeeze-Pulling Mussels (From A Shell)

 

CLOSE LOBSTERS – LET’S MAKE SOME PLANS (1987)

Along with the following years’ ‘What Is There To Smile About’ this was the classic Lobster’s single. Yes, I know it was technically only a 12″ release, but so what? ‘Plans’ is perfectly formed indie pop-and about as radio friendly as the band were ever going to get. I was just starting to learn bass guitar and took copious ideas from this tune-come to think of it, I’m probably still stealing them today. The mid-late eighties was indie pop’s real heyday, and the Lobsters made some of the sharpest tunes around.

Sounding as vital as ever, check out this majestic vinyl enterprise with a rare promo clip to boot.

Close Lobsters-Let’s Make Some Plans

 

DARREN HANLON – ALL THESE THINGS (2010)

Recently, Courtney Barnett has been citing Darren as a formative influence. This is a very good thing because the guy is a hugely talented Australian singer songwriter who deserves every success. Think Go-Betweens and Morrissey sharing a hot tub and you’re not even halfway close. This track is one of many boasting Darren’s knack for perfect pop and decent rhyming couplets.

What more could you want?

Well, how about some rarely seen Darren Hanlon ‘dad-dancing’ courtesy of Natalie van den Dungen’s classy video.

Still touring, still recording-check our Mr Hanlon, pronto…

Darren Hanlon-All These Things

I hope you enjoyed this blog-if you fancy staying in touch drop me a line, subscribe, follow or send wine etc etc.

Until next time…

 

colouredvinyl